Travis Brown Photography: The Color of Wine

A bottle of Chateauneuf de Papes:  Vieux Telegraphe, “La Crau,” over the Missouri River

A bottle of Chateauneuf de Papes: Vieux Telegraphe, “La Crau,” over the Missouri River

Even within the Show Me State of Missouri, you can find many Travis Browns.  Travis Brown the cyclist.  Travis Brown the school superintendent.  A Travis Browne that fights.  There are Travis Browns that sing, that play professional football, and even Travis Browns that advertise tattoos.  However, I think that my profile is still relatively-unique in its focus on fine wines, entrepreneurship, and growing our Midwest economy.

If there’s one Travis Brown that I should partner with, it is likely another Travis Brown with a creative focus on photography, graphic arts, and creative productions.  It turns out that even near Saint Louis, there’s another Travis Brown whose career is precisely that as well.  Even though the two of us have never met, occasionally I get to observe his handiwork inside an Opera Theatre of Saint Louis event.

Growing up on our family farm in Ste. Genevieve County, my mother and father used to say that “there’s a Brown in everything.”

There are certainly fewer Travis Brown searches related to the Northern or Southern Rhone valleys in France.  That is likely in part due merely to the fact that the name “Travis” is often thought to be derived from native American/French Canadian roots (like travois).  In any event, for those looking for great wines on this blog, I often refer you, again, to the South of France.

A recent cover article for Decanter Magazine outlines my case better than I could do for myself.  There’s so much diversity – of color, of varietals, and of blending, to be found within the Great Rhone river regions.  Even the bodies, depths, and range of colors found within Rhone whites can be incredibly complex, just like the spectrum of google searches for Travis Brown.