Missouri Lobbyists & Chief Executive Officers: Remember Your Last Five Years Without Social Media

By Travis H. Brown

This CEO.com report sounds the alarm of the tsunami of social media changes ahead within the next 60 months.  Most Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) have armies of lawyers, lobbyists, regulatory affairs experts, media relations gurus, along with many public relations agencies on some of their working priorities.  Missouri lobbyists share the same challenge – they have corporate clients who call, issue-based campaigns who email, and many others who visit from time to time.  For many contract lobbyists, mainly over 50 years of age, I suspect that they will continue to resist the wave of social mediums that are already disrupting their relevance.  To play a devil’s advocate, precisely what values have I found after my 8,443 tweets as of this moment?

Fine.  Enjoy it while it lasts.  However, as reports like these evolve, failure to define one’s digital presence will have dramatic consequences within five years or less.  As your time will fly these next 60 months, others will be standing by to define you, your scope of work, and perhaps even your legacies.

By no means am I proclaiming the end of lobbyists, in Missouri, or elsewhere (influence-peddling is at least as old as Plato’s Republic).   The fundamental organization of a strategy, a message, its production, or its direction.  All of these entrepreneurial variables will continue to be essential to how democracies and republics must work in some fashion.  However, whether or not your hired lobbyist in Jefferson City, in Springfield, or in Topeka, can remain relevant to your company’s demands with customer-driven social media will be another question.

The prosecution rests, with a statute of limitation imposed for 60 months or less remaining.  Meanwhile, New York City will be turning their payphones into wifi hotspots.